Manuela Sánchez Sotelo: The Mexican Mother of Tempe

by Dr. Christine Marin Professor Emeritus, Arizona State University; Tempe History Society Boardmember By the 1860s, Mexican families came north from Mexico to the Arizona Territory’s Salt River Valley, which was still a rough and unmanageable wilderness and subject to disputes between the Americans and the Native Americans. The Mexicans came to the farming region known today as Tempe, a …

Four Decades of Service Remembered

by Lawn Giffiths There’s a rule: Don’t touch the items in a museum. However, Mary Ann Kwilosz has had her hands all over the Tempe History Museum for four decades. She has left her prints on a full range of the activities and programs. Her legacy is intact as she retires from membership on the board of directors of the …

Commemorating Black History in Arizona: Daisy Nelson Moore and Marietta Cooper Bryant

by Dr. Christine Marin The month of February, 2022….African American History Month. An annual observance that recognizes the contributions of African Americans to the history and development of the United States. Today, I recognize and honor Daisy Nelson Moore and Marietta Cooper Bryant of the Globe-Miami, Arizona public schools. These women, who had been respected for their teaching abilities, were …

DECEMBER HISTORIC LEGENDS: KEMPER & MICHAEL GOODWIN

If the question, “Who built Tempe?”, were asked the names Kemper and Michael Goodwin would be a worthy answer.    The late father and son architect team was prolific in designing buildings that stand prominently in Tempe, across the state, and even the Southwest.   Tempe City Hall, the iconic “upside-down pyramid,” is regarded as Michael’s crowning project (1970) – …

DECEMBER LIVING LEGEND: REGGIE MACKAY

    Reggie Mackay’s mom probably instructed him to keep out of the mud.  For decades now, mud has been his livelihood. In fact, his social media email is “adobemudman@gmail.com.”    A mud man. But more accurately: adobe mud.    Reggie has worked across the West shoveling selected soils into a rotary mixer, adding water, then feeding the thick mud into …

NOVEMBER HISTORIC LEGENDS: CHARLES, SALLIE, & CARL HAYDEN

  Charles Trumbull Hayden, who has been given the title of founder of Tempe, could have stayed in Tucson and remained focused on his flourishing freight hauling business.    But, according to archives, his destiny was changed when, while he was on a business trip to Prescott, Hayden was held up for several days by floodwaters on the Salt River. …

NOVEMBER LIVING LEGEND: ZITA JOHNSON

Zita Johnson was being honored in 2001 for Tempe’s prestigious Don Carlos Humanitarian Award, it was noted that “Zita has been a committed advocate for children and has enriched our community by promoting tolerance and cultural diversity.” Her prints can be found on anything to do with public education, community dialogue, and social services in Tempe.    Her lists of …

OCTOBER HISTORIC LEGEND: ROSA KEEME (1911-2008)

She was known as “Mama Rosa,” and her green and red enchilada sauces attracted tens of thousands through the decades to her Tempe family restaurant, Rosita’s Fine Mexican Food.    Rosa Morena Keeme was a beloved fixture in the community. Rosita’s has been an anchor on the west side of Tempe. At the Mexican restaurant, Rosa could proudly use old …

OCTOBER LIVING LEGEND: JANE NEUHEISEL

Jane Neuheisel has been the face of Tempe Sister Cities, the Hackett House, Shalimar Country Club, the city’s Oktoberfest, and a force of civic involvement throughout the community.    Proud of her Wisconsin roots, she has kept up with her globetrotting lawyer husband, Dick Neuheisel, in a partnership of 62 years of marriage.  Together they were honored with the Don …